Wednesday, January 2, 2013

2013 - the year I get a teflon coating

2012 was an amazing year with a hell of a learning curve, too many carbs and a lot of firsts.

It was the first time I got more acceptance letters than rejections. It was the first year I saw my books in print. I laughed, I teared up, and I took more risks than I've taken since I stopped jumping out of perfectly good airplanes. It was a very good year.

2012 was also the year I learned that some people are going to have serious issues about what I write, and some of them are going to make sure everyone knows their opinion on it. So 2013 is the year I'm going to slap on a telfon coating, so all that negativity just slides right off.

In the past year I've been told that my chosen genre is not "really" a genre at all, but merely a niche market. That I am not truly writing, I'm just producing books in quantity instead of quality, just like pulp fiction, but to compare my genre to pulp fiction would an "insult to pulp fiction." I've been asked to support other authors by writing reviews and buying their work, but in the same request they've made it clear they "don't read" the kind of books I write and so they can't return the favour.

I've had to deal with dating relationships going sideways in part because he either thought I'd be writing him into every book from now on, or because he figured that since I write erotic romance I must be the kinkiest vixen this side of the Rocky Mountains. *laughs*

I'm not going to apologize to anyone for what I write. If you don't like it, that's fine. I personally don't like mysteries or true crime novels, but I wouldn't go around disparaging the talents or choices of those who write them beause I know how hard it is to write a book in any genre, never mind get it published.

I'm not going to let the negative nellys of the world make me question what I'm doing or who I'm doing it with. I worked my pudgy arse off to get this far, and I have a long way still to go. I don't have time to stand around and try to justify my choices to people who aren't interested in supporting me.

So feel free to express your opinion of my genre or my choice in publishers, just don't expect me to stick around to hear it. I've got books to write for the people who DO enjoy my stories.

2013. The year of Teflon. 

Bring it on. It's going to be a great year.



4 comments:

  1. Well said, Susan! Nothing pisses me off more than other writers asking for reviews or favors and yet in the next breath knocking our genre or our publishing house. Face it people…not everyone makes the NY Times Bestsellers list and, if you’re one of these assholes who has just gotten a publishing deal and are ALREADY thinking you are better than other writers, than you probably never will. I give credit to all writers. We are putting a piece of ourselves out there for mass consumption. The beauty of it is that there are so many readers looking for a variety of work to read that we writers will find someone who will appreciate what we put out there. With that said, I normally don’t say anything bad about other writers or readers…but the exception to this rule is someone who is slamming our genre of erotica/romance. Simple solution – if you don’t like our genre than don’t read it! BUT if you are one of those people running your mouth saying that it’s just a niche or that you are better than us…well, to those I say – fuck off and go get laid or go read a cookbook ‘cause if you can’t handle reading about sex that you should stick to baking...

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well said. My response to the people who say, "Oh, that's not REAL writing," is to shoot back, "Funny, my bank, mortgage company, and all the places I pay bills to say it's REAL MONEY. And, oh yeah, I was able to get my hubby RETIRED because of my 'not-real' writing, how's YOUR evil day job going, hmmm?"

    That usually shuts them right the hell up.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Laurie and Tymber, you ladies rock. Thanks for the the support. And Tymber, I love that your hubby got to retire off your writing, that's awesome!

    ReplyDelete
  4. You signed a legal contract. People buy the books and you're paid royalties on sales. If that's not "real" writing, what is?

    ReplyDelete